Wednesday, October 18, 2017

Taste of TMC5: Leveraging Technology

Culturally Relevant and Responsive School Library LearningCommons

School libraries and eLearning: Answering the call for access and equity by Michelle Campbell and Alanna King

Campbell and King share their work in Upper Grand District School Board to address equity and access to eLearning for all learners but especially at risk adolescents.
  • Learning beyond school walls
  • School libraries as safe spaces for eLearning
  • Embedded school librarianship in online classrooms
  • Imperative support for at-risk eLearning students
  • Bridging the digital divide by partnering with public libraries


Founding Fathers Fighting to Toppling Tarnished Tributes – The Impact of Social Media, Primary Sources and Equity Education on A “Kids Guide to Canada” Prime Ministers Project by Diana Maliszewski

How can we help every student grow to be informed and active Canadians and global citizens?
What starts out as a family ‘Canada 150’ project soon morphs into a teaching and learning challenge for Diana Maliszewski. Enjoy this personal research journey through the conflicts and biases uncovered in some typical school library secondary sources and keep pace with the discoveries of alternate perspectives due to ‘real life’ incidents and then on to new revelations prompted by social media postings. Maliszewski then relates how she plans to take her own learning into the design of lessons for her classes. Only Maliszewski ends up with many still unsolved questions. Please add comments to this page if you have ideas and suggestions for her next steps.

Digital Human Library: Reimagining Library Collections in the 21st Century by Leigh Cassell

"With 19% of Canada’s population living in rural areas, there is an urgent need for resources and training to support students attending school in rural settings. Connections-based learning addresses many of the inequities rural students face by leveraging our connected world to cultivate meaningful relationships with others, as we partner locally and globally, learn with experts, support organizations, and serve our communities"
You can learn more about Leigh by visiting her website: https://www.digitalhumanlibrary.org


Sunday, October 15, 2017

Taste of TMC 5 Papers: Learning Partnerships

Culturally Relevant and Responsive School Library Learning Commons: Learning Partnerships


Power of the Arts and Technology in Collaborating with an Aboriginal Teen by Rhonda Hunter

“What happens when you pair a teacher-librarian with an Aboriginal teen?” In this paper you will discover the process and result of one such delightful collaboration resulting in the creation of a picture book about the prairie’s famous Chinooks, Chinook and Winter, written by teacher-librarian Rhonda Hunter and illustrated by high school student Jayce Lamontagne. Hunter presents the backgrounds of both writer and artist, incorporating technology effectively in the process, and encouraging educators to consider such collaborations in all schools.

 Inquiry Buddies by Greg Harris and Khai Ma

"There are many challenges when teachers and classrooms want to plan and work together. For planning, allocating money to facilitate the learning amongst teachers can always be a challenge. As a Principal, when a teacher or group of teachers initiate an interest that promotes learning and development of relationships among varying groups of students it is hard not to support this...."Allison Thomas, Principal of Ardagh Bluffs P.S. from Inquiry Buddies by Harris & Ma

 Working Together as a Learning Community by Pat Trottier

In her paper Pat Trottier shares many school projects and initiatives where relationship building had a very positive impact on teaching and learning. Teachers and students built stronger connections and parents and other community members were important partners in learning to understand and appreciate each other. Trottier relates how her diverse school community came together, over a two year period, as a culturally responsive learning community with the Library Learning Commons central to all programs.

Infusing Indigenous Perspectives in our Teaching and Learning by Joel Krentz

"A number of staff members had some legitimate concerns; a) they did not want to offend and b) they did not want to appropriate. Outside of the curriculum, they felt that they did not know enough about Indigenous culture and history to be able to effectively share these perspectives. They wanted to know what activities and teaching approaches were culturally sensitive and appropriate and which were not. I acknowledged these concerns and agreed to learn more myself and share what I learned at the next division meetings in June. I had homework to do." 


Wednesday, October 11, 2017

TMC5 Papers

TMC5 Theme: Culturally Relevant and Responsive School Library Learning Commons


  • Learning Environment 
  • Instructional Approaches 
  • Learning Partnerships 
  • Leveraging Technology

TMC 2017 Papers are published on a Google site to promote collaborative study and dialogue. Papers are peer reviewed and posted as soon as possible. More are coming so keep revisiting the site.


The papers have been posted according to the four subthemes of this symposium however the editors acknowledge that many papers actually connect across more than one theme. Each paper has its own page complete with information about the author and a brief summary of the work. At the bottom of the page a PDF of the paper is attached for you to study. As you read you can add comments for the author in the comments section under the PDF Paper. The authors will appreciate your thoughts, questions and additional ideas and links and we encourage our authors to respond to comments.

All paper writers and attendees at TMC5 in Winnipeg will have access to make comments if we have your gmail address. We hope that everyone will read as many papers as possible before coming to the symposium in Winnipeg because we will not have time during the event. If you are not able to attend in person we would still appreciate your comments.

NOTE: You need to sign into this site with your Google account to add comments to the papers. Look for the 'Sign In' tab at the bottom of Home Page'.